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Cape Coral Hospital Celebrates 25 Years of Special Deliveries

Cape Coral Hospital Celebrates 25 Years of Special Deliveries

Doug and Robin still live and work in Southwest Florida. Heather, 24, is in graduate school in Ohio. The family lived in Cape Coral when Heather was born. The Cook family is one of thousands who have shared memories at Cape Coral Hospital.
Employees and visitors at Cape Coral Hospital often hear the chords of “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” when they walk down the hall. The tune signals the birth of a baby at the hospital. But when Massachusetts resident Yvette Montplaisir welcomed her son, Erik, in 1988, there was no tune. Yvette was a pioneer of sorts—the first expectant mother to check into the unit.

“I went to see it just before the unit opened,” Yvette says. “When they had the opening ceremony, I cut the ribbon.”

The day Yvette delivered, she had a bevy of nurses to help her with her new baby. “When I arrived at the hospital for delivery, we came off the elevators and all the nurses were waiting for us,” she says.

That personal touch still exists, well after the nurses and physicians have helped moms deliver thousands of babies during the past 25 years.

“The unit here has changed a lot in the past 25 years,” says supervisor Leslie Anderson, RN. “We have become much more family focused.” New parents now get skin-to-skin contact as soon as the baby is born, other family is permitted in the delivery room if the mother wants them there and mothers who require a casarean section experience a “gentle C-section,” with minimal noise and distraction during the procedure.

“We’re high-tech and high-touch,” says Nancy Travis, nursing director, Women’s Care Birth Suites, Cape Coral Hospital. “We are always looking for new things to make the birth experience special.”

Music piped into birthing rooms, privacy curtains adorned with beach scenes and a telemetry fetal monitoring system are among the amenities that mothers can expect when they check into the unit. Also, babies stay in their mother’s room from the moment they enter the world.

One of the biggest changes is the number of births. “When the unit first opened, there would be days without a delivery,” says supervisor Liz Finn, RN. “Now, we have thousands each year. With 23 labor rooms, we have room for everyone.”

Join the Party

Staff members have planned a 25th anniversary party, scheduled for Oct. 12. Yvette Montplaisir, the first to deliver a baby in the unit, plans to be among the guests. For more information, call 424-2217.

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